THE PEOPLE

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Africa? The country, where people get sick of HIV, where the tribes still live in old houses build with wood and the roof is made out of palmtree leaves, where young girls are taken as hostages and where we spent money to the poor people on christmas?

First at all Africa is not a country, it’s a continent, I have visited a wonderful country called Tanzania, on the East Coast and secondly the people are everything else than poor. They are rich of good weather, a wonderful country, loads of fruits and not to forget, they have a lot of happiness.

Just look at the pictures above. Everyone has a big smile on their face. People definitley smile more in Tanzania. One girl, called “Sia”, which actually means “Happiness” in Kisuaheli, told me, that it’s because of their music. Even in church they sing and have fun.

Friday afternoon at school, we’re coming out of the library and in the middle of the schoolyard is a big group of students dancing and singing. Or Geography class in Form two, we already went over to the part, where the students could ask us some questions and they seriously asked us if we could sing our National Anthem. After some coughing we start singing, surprised about how much fun it actually can be to sing in front of 60 tanzanian students. This class ends up to be a big concert. After our National Anthem, the students presenting us their traditional music and than it’s our turn again- a typical german children song.

Tanzania surprises me in many ways, I didn’t expected it to be so green, I didn’t expected it to be so cold or so modern in some ways. Of course cliches doesn’t come from nowhere, so there are these old and typical Masai Houses, of course I hear about young girls, getting pregnant or get sick of HIV, but all in all I am surprised and overwhelmed of all the happiness. I felt welcome from the first moment on, when I stepped outside the airport. I guess the most common sentence I have listend to on this trip was “You’re warmly welcome!” or “Again, you’re very much welcome”. I still have to smile, if I think about all the hands I had to shake and to hold for so long. I am still thankful for all the kindness I got to know in Tanzania. This wonderful trip would have not been the the same without these amazing people!

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